JAPANESE SOCIETY CHIE NAKANE PDF

Karlo Guingon Karlo S. Zulueta, Ph. She regards vertical relationships as a static and a historical cultural phenomenon it is true that Japanese social relationships are predominantly vertical or hierarchical, but this is not a cultural given. But I think Nakane was able to discuss indirectly how the vertical relationship was maintained and one good example is the distinction of sempai and kohai. Thanks to Nakane these two criteria helped me to easily understand the Japanese relationships which she was discussing in her book. It indirectly shows that they observe hierarchy in their society.

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Start your review of Japanese Society Write a review Shelves: japanese-literature In the late s, Ruth Benedict published "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword," one of the first in-depth studies on Japanese culture widely read by the West and still considered a seminal work today. About twenty years later, Prof. Chie Nakane wrote this book on the same topic, which would also go on to become a famous work in the genre.

Nakane goes over much of the same material, but In the late s, Ruth Benedict published "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword," one of the first in-depth studies on Japanese culture widely read by the West and still considered a seminal work today. Nakane goes over much of the same material, but whereas Benedict centered her research very heavily on giri obligation , Nakane focuses on localized "frames" as the basis of Japanese society. Essentially, a "frame" is a subjective environment based on immediate contextual relationships.

In other words, whoever is immediately around you and whatever immediately concerns you. This is in opposition to "attributes," which are broader, more universal aspects of a person.

Being a college student is an attribute, for example. Being a student from Harvard university, in their medical research department, between the years , etc. Being a father is an attribute. Nakane says that "the most characteristic feature of Japanese social organization arises from the single bond in social relationships: an individual or a group has always one single distinctive relationship to the other. For example, the dedication of the average Japanese "salaryman" is legendary, as is the involvement of their company in what we would consider their private lives.

Salarymen typically stay with one company their entire lives, never leaving even if another job is available somewhere else at higher pay. This is puzzling to Americans, but only because we typically view ourselves in terms of attributes, not frame. Take an American lawyer. If asked what he does for a living, he will probably say "I am a lawyer. Being a lawyer is his attribute. In Japan, this order is reversed. There, he works for "such and such legal firm. As you can see, a frame is much more specific and personal.

A society built around frame networks will come to see their surroundings as much more intimate and close than one built on attributes. An American is unlikely to ask his boss for help with his wedding unless he happens to be personal friends with his boss.

This is because his boss is just someone he works for, nothing more. In Japan your boss is part of personal "frame," the means by which you place yourself in society. He is much more than a boss, and your job is not just a way to make money.

Your company is more like a family, maybe in some ways more intimate than your blood-relatives. Regardless of how right or wrong you think such a dynamic is, understanding this is key to understanding Japanese society as a whole according to Nakane. It is behind the highly hierarchical mindset of the average Japanese and has endured despite the many changes Japan has undergone since modernization. I have encountered the ideas of this books in several other works written about Japan.

I would be more interested to read a revised version of this book that take into account several new aspects globalization, the social model in start-up businesses, etc.

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Japanese Society

Start your review of Japanese Society Write a review Shelves: japanese-literature In the late s, Ruth Benedict published "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword," one of the first in-depth studies on Japanese culture widely read by the West and still considered a seminal work today. About twenty years later, Prof. Chie Nakane wrote this book on the same topic, which would also go on to become a famous work in the genre. Nakane goes over much of the same material, but In the late s, Ruth Benedict published "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword," one of the first in-depth studies on Japanese culture widely read by the West and still considered a seminal work today. Nakane goes over much of the same material, but whereas Benedict centered her research very heavily on giri obligation , Nakane focuses on localized "frames" as the basis of Japanese society. Essentially, a "frame" is a subjective environment based on immediate contextual relationships.

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Chie Nakane

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